• Friday July 10,2020

expulsion

The, somewhat insensitive designated, expulsion phase is the last phase of the birth. The baby is forced into the external world through strong pressure from the uterus through the birth canal, followed by the afterbirth - then the birth is over.

What is the expulsion phase?

The expulsion phase is the last phase of the birth.

A human birth is divided into several phases. They all serve to prepare the body for the most intense phase, the expulsion phase. While the sucking before birth gave the baby as close as possible to the birth canal, the opening pains served to dilate the cervix. During this time, usually the amniotic sac has already burst, so the baby now has to be born for self-contained breathing.

The opening pains came every few minutes and were mostly in their intensity to endure well or were made bearable by the gift of a PDA. The press pains, in turn, are characteristic of the expulsion phase in which the baby is forced out through the widened cervix. They are much stronger and more painful and also set in every few minutes, but with significant breaks in between.

Depending on the woman and her labor history, the staging phase can take from a few minutes to an hour or more. While the woman should not squeeze during the opening pains, she must and must support the pressing swells of the ejection phase with vigorous pressing down to speed up the process. The contractions end almost immediately after the baby is born. Meanwhile, the placenta usually dissolves on its own and leaves the body of the mother through a gentler aftermath, which usually causes her no more pain.

Function & Task

The expulsion phase is the last phase of a birth. After her follow only the physical processes after the birth of the baby. During one of the previous stages of birth, the amniotic sac has burst - if not, then it does so now. The baby is thus no longer surrounded by fluid and must start to breathe independently. If it takes too long to air, there is danger of suffocation, which is why obstetricians have to intervene in births that take too long.

In a normal expulsion phase, the contractions begin, which, although much more intense than the previous opening pains, are perceived by many women as relieving. The mother's job now is to take a position that is right for her and push her down hard, thus supporting the expulsion phase. Had she done that before during the opening phase of childbirth, that might have pushed the baby into the birth canal too soon. The Austreibungsphase but now has exactly this goal.

With the pressing labor, the baby's head first reaches the outside through the vagina with the correct birth position, then it usually only needs one or two more contractions and the baby leaves the mother's body. It can now breathe independently and start screaming, which is a sign that his breathing has begun to work.

The afterbirth happens without labor, the contractions of the uterus are hormonal and are hardly felt as painful. Normally, the placenta separates from the middle, starting on its own, and leaves the woman's body following the child. This process is usually 10 to 20 minutes after birth.

Diseases & complaints

During the exacerbation phase, complications may occur in the birth of the baby as well as in the afterbirth. If the opening phase was already exhausting, it may be that the woman does not have sufficient energy reserves to compress. If the baby can not be born, a caesarean section will be necessary.

The baby should turn one more time before the opening to the expulsion phase - if that is not the case, the caesarian section is also necessary. At best, the baby remains inconveniently stuck in the birth canal and it is enough to engage with the suction cup.

Difficulties in the expulsion phase can continue to result from the afterbirth. If the placenta does not loosen or does not completely loosen, it can be helped from the outside by gripping techniques. However, this is only done if obstetricians are sure that the afterbirth will not resolve on its own.

The most serious complication is excessive bleeding, in which the mother loses more than 500 ml of blood. These can be cushioned by administration of oxytocin and triggered uterine contractions or surgical procedures.

Furthermore, it must be investigated whether the afterbirth has completely disappeared after the expulsion phase. Otherwise, the remaining tissue would die off and result in childbed fever, one of the most common causes of death after birth in earlier centuries. Today this complication is met with ultrasound examination and scraping, if tissue of the afterbirth has not left by itself.


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